Why do you study typology?

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  • #14867
    Supah Protist
    Participant
    • Type: SeTi
    • Development: ll-l
    • Attitude: Directive

    I noticed this in my discussion with @scientiam, that I think people have at least two different fundamental motivations behind why they're interested in CT and typology in general. My motivation is primarily to understand myself, while Scientiam seems more interested in understanding the phenomenon of typology itself. I'm trying to learn more about myself specifically while he seems more focused on understanding how people/brains work in general.
    Here's my question. Why are you interested in CT? Are you using it as a tool to better understand yourself, or others? Alternatively, are you even using it for understanding? If not, is it more about improving yourself or others? Lastly, if I didn't list your motivation, what is it?

    #14868
    Keso
    Participant
    • Type: NeFi
    • Development: lll-
    • Attitude: Seelie

    My answer is quite complex - I've got involved with typology because of several reasons: it stimulates my curiousness, it's not complete and it's still quite flexible and open to changes. Psychological typology sparks my interest  and fascinates me by showing how different and unique people are. I want to understand others and to help others understand themselves so typology is a great tool to "get" different minded people. It helps me to live their lives, I want to write and typology also helps me to create interesting characters.
    The first time I took a MBTI test I was 14 years old and got ESTJ. It was a helpful tool for understanding myself. Then I took it again several years later and got an INFJ. Then INFP, INTP, ENTP, so I was ready to dump this theory when I found out about CT. So typology finally made more sense. Now I'm a psychology major and I do want to work in this field, I mean, spread and understand psychological typology more deeply. I even want to use it as a method, my mind is open to new discoveries and future fruitful usage of typology.

    #14919
    Thana
    Participant
    • Type: NiTe
    • Development: lll-
    • Attitude: Unseelie

    I love to categorize and organize data so typology feeds into those natural tendencies. Even before encountering any system, I realized early on that certain subsets of people display and follow certain patterns in behavior and mindsets. Long story short, the deeper that I engage in these systems the more I realize how *enduring* and grounded these archetypes are. We are reaching into something that taps into the collective unconscious. Various typology systems are languages, and just like verbal and written language, evolve over time. But I hope there's an inherent teleos to the evolution, an evolution that better elucidates the universal principles of these systems. But of course language evolves with an evolution in culture and human relations, and we create that teleos through how we interface with these systems.

    #14931
    Tea
    Participant
    • Type: NeFi
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Seelie

    ^^ Copy. Paste. All of these.

    #14948
    Discord
    Participant
    • Type: Unknown
    • Development:
    • Attitude: Unknown

    Existential crises.

    #14956
    Hrafn
    Participant
    • Type: SiTe
    • Development: l-ll
    • Attitude: Seelie

    Are you using it as a tool to better understand yourself, or others?

    By far the most obvious response for me would be that I'm using it to understand myself, but I actually don't know if I can separate the goals of understanding myself or understanding others. For one thing, understanding others means being able to simulate their experiences at some level, which ultimately requires me to understand my own perspective & draw from my own experience.
    Just as basically, understanding myself means understanding who I am vis-à-vis the vast, dynamic social-ecological system that is the world. I don't know that understanding CT has really changed the basic arrangement of how I see myself & my place in the world, but I guess it's given clarity to something that before I understood only either in pieces & parts or as a vague, unfocused whole. I often understand the world as an enormous, unfolding storyline, and I'm always questioning what kind of character am I.
     

    Alternatively, are you even using it for understanding?

    Well, yes I am, but if I'm being completely honest I can't say that's the whole picture. Because I am myself, rather than an impartial observer, naturally I want to see my character in the world-story as someone who's rounded, unique, contributes to good rather than evil, etc. And this is where questions of self-understanding are hopelessly jumbled up with questions of identity. (I don't mean identity in a sociological sense, but more in the sense of ego or self-image).
    As I go through life each day and experience my own behavior, I find there are some things I like a lot about myself, some things I'm pretty indifferent about, and other things about myself I really don't care for. These don't necessarily follow an obvious pattern--for instance, the things I dislike about myself aren't necessarily all character flaws, or things that others would dislike--sometimes they're more just things I have personal a distaste for (and at times I don't even understand why I have a distaste for them).
    One way to think about identity is that it's a collection of stories that I tell to myself, about myself. Naturally, I tend to tell self-stories that emphasize traits that I favor, and downplay the ones that I dislike. At the same time, I recognize that these stories I tell myself are biased in this way, and this can cause lots of doubt.
    (As an aside, though, I don't necessarily think telling myself stories from a certain angle is inherently a bad thing. First of all, it's inevitable that I'm going to have some angle or perspective, and I trust that I have adequate reasons for being attracted to certain ways of being, even if I don't completely understand what those reason are. Secondly, telling myself stories can be a way of becoming more mindful about whether/when I'm actually manifesting what I'm drawn toward identifying with).
    Trying to resolve doubt around identity was a big part of what fueled my off-&-on interest in typology over the years. Unfortunately, I never found any typology helped much with this. Part of this was because I could never resolve what type I actually was in any definite way. They all just created opportunities for more doubt. In the Jungian-based systems, I went endlessly back and forth between the four high-Ne types. I never even considered Si-lead because Si-leads were construed in a very narrow way that didn't fit me at all.
    So when I originally ran into CT I was looking for a more definite way to resolve some of these questions. Interestingly, I would say that being typed as an Si-lead--even though I actively questioned that typing at first--really opened my mind to some things I hadn't considered about myself. For instance, even though I've known my type for well over a year now, being a conductor type still feels a little bit new & unusual to me because historically I've been vacillating & doubtful in so many ways...or at least, I understood myself that way. (probably a I-II thing). Yet this has brought out something I hadn't really considered about myself, and I've come to recognize that as I've matured over the last decade or so, I've been very gradually growing into the "conductor role." At the same time, it also makes me aware that I need to be careful not to lose some of the things I've always valued (and still value) as part of my reviser-esque past...and this is where I see how a continued role for working out my own identity in a way that CT knowledge can augment...Not for me to recreate myself as something I'm not, but for me to better understand how I want to embody who I already am from within a range of possibilities that's now more clear than it was before.
     

    #16130
    Muwu
    Blocked
    • Type: SiTe
    • Development: l-ll
    • Attitude: Seelie

    I got into typology through college. At first it was a way of understanding my own perspectives, but then it became a system that I used to break down language and intention(s) / relationships from other people. Perspective has always been a rather big thing for me, but I haven't always been able to succinctly voice my opinion in a coherent manner & typology has given me a way to frame it to other people.

    #16136
    EpicEntity
    Participant
    • Type: SeTi
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Directive

    CT makes me think about Matter over Mind instead of Mind over Matter.

    When you take away the mind and soul I know of nothing else that would remain except for the way CT describes Jung's functions and energetics... and perhaps some brain mapping on the side. What is this human machine capable of when you get yourself out of the way? Even more interesting... what happens when you reintegrate yourself in just the right way and let your function propel you to the greatest heights? Exactly how far will the sum be greater than it's parts?
    Not to mention: Keso made some highly intriguing points that I resonate with on a surprisingly near fully conscious level.

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