Updating the Model & Book 2

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  • Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

    Hiya,

    As many of you have sensed, CT is in a bit of a transition phase right now– a critical theoretical threshold. In the process of its ongoing refinement, enough core changes have accumulated to make necessary the transformation of the theory on every key front– in metabolism, vultology, behaviorism and mythology.

    With many key articles now outdated, the form which the model needs to take is quite different from the form it’s recently had, although the phenomenon being excavated is still the same.

    • Words like “Abstract” for N, “Concrete” for S, “Ethical” for F and “Logical” for T need to be eliminated.
    • The F attitudes need to be considered emotional attitudes separated from cognition.
    • The model needs to be restructured as a cognitive architecture.
    • The phenomenology and philosophy of the functions needs to be explicitly written.
    • The psychoanalytical implications need to be well formulated.
    • The vultology code needs to be chiseled into a better shape to allow for the mass creation of CSV files that capture signals second by second.
    • And the behavioral profiles that follow need to be updated as well.

    This updating process is extensive enough that I’ll be approaching it in parallel with the publication of book 2. It’s now four years since book 1, and so much has been uncovered in that time that it’ll be easier to re-frame everything from start to finish, rather than attempting to make small adjustments to the existing materials. This will take a while to complete (I’m aiming for mid 2021) but I will be sharing initial drafts of the content with you all for feedback– which is always so valuable to me.

    My vision for this book is one of a textbook-sized, formal work that can be a reference guide for both the laymen and the clinician. This probably won’t be an ‘easy-read’, since I intend to dive into critical philosophical questions and psychoanalytic subjects. This book can be thought of more as a college textbook, and although it will be dense, I hope to still make it as digestible and comprehensible as possible.

    But until then, I’ll just have to accumulate the newest theoretical tenants on the Pending Updates page. Thank you all for your patience, and all your participation in exploring this phenomenon together!

    Spoiler:

    (….and for anyone who can’t wait, or who wishes to get a look at the book in advance, I’ve made a pre-order page here. >.>)

    As with book 1, I’ll be sharing periodic previews of some complete chapters with the pre-orderers, both as my personal thanks for helping to bring it about , and for beta-testing/feedback.

    • This topic was modified 1 month ago by Auburn.
    • This topic was modified 1 month ago by Auburn.
    • This topic was modified 1 month ago by Auburn.
    • This topic was modified 1 month ago by Auburn.
    • This topic was modified 1 month ago by Auburn.
    • This topic was modified 1 month ago by Auburn.
    • This topic was modified 1 month ago by Auburn.
    bella
    Participant
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Directive

    OHHH I can’t wait for this book to be complete!! The table is contents sounds absolutely fascinating~

    Auburn is being too humble hiding it away 😉 .. so here’s a little screen shot for you guys 🙂

    (If you go into the link in the spoiler Auburn posted above you can check out the table of contents)

    <33

    Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

    lol!

    ..I don’t wanna give it too much attention because it’s still a long ways away. And I don’t like the idea of promoting something non-ready, but knowing myself, I know that part of what kicks my ass into working hard is knowing that I have to meet deadlines and answer to real people. Knowing I’ve made a promise and that people are waiting will pressure me to truly make it happen.

    (I also don’t wanna promote it too much because this book is not for everyone. It’s deliberately priced high because it will take the form of a 500+ page 8′ x 11′ textbook, not a standard 6′ x 9′ ~200 page book. It’s the sort of resource most necessary for a practitioner or academic.)

    Also, since the book 2 content will take a lot of resources/time to write and to composite together, the material won’t be freely available on the site at first, but parts of it will be freely accessible eventually — since I can’t help but be a believer of free information. Parts of it will start to come online free as soon as there’s been a recovery of the initial investment.

     

    Chiron
    Participant
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: ll-l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

    It’s exciting to see you taking the theory in this overall direction!

    Pardon my skepticism about the psychoanalytical aspect though 😝

    “The fourth section of this book, titled Mythology, focuses on the psychoanalytical approach and offers suggestions for how to lead a patient through their unique developmental journey and the integration of functions into consciousness.”

    Perhaps you’ve indeed identified particular differences between the types at this level, but just judging from the previous work on mythology as it relates to particular functions I’d caution you not to make too many assumptions. It seems to me that CT relates to an evolutionarily recent phenomenon, or the ‘cognitive framework’ as you’ve termed it, while things like myths and dreams are influenced primarily by the more ancient (and thus general) level of somato-visual interpretation as influenced by the ethogenic aspect of cultural accomodation. This refers to the temporal paradox that Jung indicated as being the nature of the ‘Soul’ – as our deeper/subconscious inclinations are formed from the abstraction of instincts (our most ancient ‘timeless’ aspect) as well as the immediate context of the cultural climate we happen to be raised with (something modern and transient). That’s not to say that one’s particular cognitive apparatus has no role in selecting information, on the contrary certain themes/characters are likely to be more interesting to certain quadra and functional attitudes (T, F, etc.) But from what I’ve seen, affinity for a specific narrative and archetypal embodiment has more to do with one’s life experience, esp. in the case of trauma related fixation, than it does with cognitive type.

    I’m sure you have many interesting ideas on this topic that I by no means would wish to squelch. But of course I’m always interested in the positive development of CT, and as psychoanalysis is one of my keenest interests, this is the type of misinterpretation I’d like to help prevent.

    Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

    It’s exciting to see you taking the theory in this overall direction!
    Pardon my skepticism about the psychoanalytical aspect though 😝

    Hey! Thanks.
    And feel free. 🙂

    Perhaps you’ve indeed identified particular differences between the types at this level, but just judging from the previous work on mythology as it relates to particular functions I’d caution you not to make too many assumptions.

    Yes, I certainly intend to be very careful in how I approach the matter. Psychoanalytic work is not easy to do well and requires a lot of knowledge. I’ve been very minimal in my expansion of CT into this domain for this very reason. The previous mythology material has been a rough first drafts of a phenomenon, and I agree they were much too general. I don’t think it was applicable, in practice, in that form.

    I’ve been reading more of Jung’s works and that of Jung’s students, in hopes of being better prepared to tackle this project. But I do think the topic cannot be avoided, and if I didn’t try to do it, someone else would eventually anyway. It was Jung, after all, who first wrote Psychological Types, and his creation of the book was as a response to Freud and William James, among others, regarding differences in their views of people which positively or negatively affected the clinical practice.

    It seems to me that CT relates to an evolutionarily recent phenomenon, or the ‘cognitive framework’ as you’ve termed it, while things like myths and dreams are influenced primarily by the more ancient (and thus general) level of somato-visual interpretation as influenced by the ethogenic aspect of cultural accomodation.

    Yes, the psychoanalytic practice relates primarily to the contents of the archetypal structure and their contemporary manifestation in the present social situation. Thus, the intersection of cognitive type and analytical psychology is not all-pervasive, and type is indeed more evolutionary recent.

    However, it’s also not beside the point. Just as everything plays into the manifestation of that archetypal structure in a given time, it also manifests in a given person through their type. Aside from the archaic and societal layers, and the personal layers that relate to emotional traumas and fixations, there are also typological layers of influence that affect our life narratives.

    The omission of cognitive typology, from the work of psychoanalysis, can be detrimental to an understanding of a patient, their inner life and emotional struggles.

    That’s not to say that one’s particular cognitive apparatus has no role in selecting information, on the contrary certain themes/characters are likely to be more interesting to certain quadra and functional attitudes (T, F, etc.)

    Mhm, I think we have found many such things, and this information could be very beneficial to psychologists.

    But from what I’ve seen, affinity for a specific narrative and archetypal embodiment has more to do with one’s life experience, esp. in the case of trauma related fixation, than it does with cognitive type.

    Oh I see, I should clarify. I don’t intend to generate something so fixed as to aim to predict a person’s specific traumas/fixations or struggles, from their type alone. Jung was very explicit in saying that each person is a unique set of variables that needs to be addressed as a mystery to be unraveled for what it says in itself, and I think he was right about that.

    I don’t intend to develop a formulaic approach to the type+psychoanalysis conjunction, with a deterministic outcome. Instead I aim to provide a probabilistic array of outcomes, supported by the current data on real people/types, that elucidates on how we see types+developments unfurl across life and what common difficulties they face when all other things are equal.

    This is why I frame the book, in the description, as something to be integrated into the personal practice of the clinician, and not as something that is a standalone protocol for psychoanalysis. It would be a tool in the toolbox of the analyst.

    When completed, I hope to work closely with a few practitioners, train them in vultology, and correspond with them about how compelling or accurate the manual was in their practice. If it’s useful, then it may spread to a broader circle, the same way that many practitioners nowadays use enneagram or other systems in their approach. And if it’s unsuccessful, then I hope to integrate that feedback all the same, and adjust things accordingly.

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