Ocular Tension (in Codifier 3.0)

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  • Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

    Hello!

    In preparation for the upcoming vultology quiz this weekend, this thread is a detailed guide on reading Ocular Tension. But first I have to reiterate that ocular tension is NOT the end-all-be-all of the P axes. Ocular tension signals are static signals, and thus are prone to falter due to anatomical differences among people. They represent about 1/3 of the equation for what the P axes of a person is.

    The other two thirds are:

    • – Dynamic Eye/Gaze Behavior
    • – Body Grounding/Suspension

    If you rely only on the static ocular tension signals, you have a higher chance of getting the P axis wrong than getting it right, since they don’t even account for 50% of the criteria. But, having said that, they are still real and valid — so in this thread we’re gonna go through how to read ocular tension in Codifier 3.0.

    As with everything in this new codifier, we are simplifying things and looking only for unique/root signals. And the ocular tension can be more or less fully described by just using three criteria:

    • Taut/Lax Preseptal Area (above the eye)
    • Taut/Lax Pretarsal Area (the eyelids)
    • Taut/Lax Orbital Area (outer edges)

    That’s all. But we’ll go into this in depth. First, here is a diagram showing what these areas of measurement are:

    These three areas can vary independent of one another, in their tension, so they need to be tracked separately. The tautness or laxness of these areas corresponds to one P axis or the other. This correspondence looks like this:

    Since there are 3 criteria, this means that if 2 out of 3 of them fall into the Ne/Si axis or the Ni/Se axis — then that axis has the majority vote. That axis will have the “most weight”, at least based on ocular tension alone. However, other things like grounded/suspended body movements or eye-toggles can easily tip the scales back into the opposite axis’ favor. So be careful! In general, you just need to let the new codifier make this calculation for you. All you gotta do is independently measure whether each of these 3 areas is taut or lax — nothing more. In the following posts I’m going to show you what these things look like, when each of these three sections are taut or lax, in combination with each other. Hope this thread is helpful!

    Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

    GGG: 3/3 for Ni-Se

    I’m gonna start simple here and show the most prototypical Ni-Se appearance. This is what it looks like when 3/3 signals are in favor of the Ni-Se axis:

    ^ As you can see, the area above the eye is raised, while the outer edges (orbital) are also raised… however, the eyelid is lowered. These three together make “the most” Ni-Se static appearance, and if you see all these three, it’s a very strong indicator that they are Ni-Se. It might still be possible to overturn this, but all the other Ni-Se signals would have to be mission in order to do so.

    Examples:

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Auburn.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Auburn.
    Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

    GGS: 2/3 for Ni-Se

    Next I’m gonna go to a variant of the above, where everything but the outer edges are in favor of Ni-Se:

    ^ As you can see, the area above the eyes is elevated, while the eyebrows are lowered — however, the outer edges are not raised. Nevertheless, this scores 2/3 in favor of Ni-Se and thus it still is overall more weighted towards Ni-Se, in a static sense.

    Examples:

    ^ So all these fall into the category of Ni-Se (if nothing else is being considered.)

    And this is the key point of departure from the older and more ambiguous view which confused the angle of the “slant” to tell the P axes. If you notice, the eyes above are slanted downward at the outside edges and upward towards the center. But this in itself is not proof of Si-Ne. What matters are what combination of the above 3 criteria are present.

    Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

    SSS: 3/3 for Ne-Si

    For the sake of working up a helpful contrast, I’m gonna switch gears now and go to Ne-Si, showing the most clear example of Ne-Si ocular tension with 3/3 in favor of it:

    ^ Here we see the eyelids are brightly open, while the area above the eyes is lowered, as well as the outer edges.

    Examples:

    So this one also has a similar sort of “slant” shape as the above post does, due to the sharing of a lax orbtial area, but here we see how it’s clearly Ne-Si. The angle of the slant (due to a lax orbital area) is not really relevant by itself. It’s only in conjunction with the other areas that it creates an emergent whole which may point one way or another.

    Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

    SSG: 2/3 for Ne-Si

    Now I wanna do the inverse for Ne-Si, and show what it looks like when one signal is missing — specifically the outer edges being raised.

    In this variant, the eyelids and the area above the eye are pretty close together, and the eye still appears “bright” – but the outer edges are a bit raised. The graphic above doesn’t have the most representative appearance, but we can look at the examples below for a better look:

    Examples:

    ^ Tom Cruise, clearly showing Ne-Si tension, but with raised outer edges (2/3 for Ne-Si)

    ^ Orlando Bloom, showing pretty straight/horizontal eyebrows, but with some tension on the outer edges

    ^ Emma Watson, also showing pretty straight/horizontal eyebrows, with some tension on the outer edges

    Young people of all ages will tend to have some plumpness and firmness on the outer edges, so you really don’t wanna over-highlight that for identifying Ni-Se. If anything, use the Preseptal and Pretarsal regions more for differentiation. But the outer edges do count for something, just not in isolation.

    (Also, watch out for eyebrow  hairs, some people’s eyebrow follicles are higher up than others, or they ‘comb’ themselves in different directions. You can see some of that in Tom Cruise for instance, but also Richard Dawkins.)

    ^ Nicole Kidman

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Auburn.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Auburn.
    Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

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    Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

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    Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

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    Auburn
    Keymaster
    • Type: TiNe
    • Development: l--l
    • Attitude: Adaptive

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