Reply To: Female Figures in Religion & Media

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Animal
Participant
  • Type: SeFi
  • Development: lll-
  • Attitude: Unseelie

Before Aphrodite, there were other depictions of the “Goddess of Beauty.” In the Sumerian Tablets, this was Innanna – somewhere between Te and Se.  She was later known as Ishtar.

She was the Goddess of War, and the way she went about warring was Se; in that she seduced men and tricked them at the last minute.  She was sent to rule over areas near India, which is why Goddesses like Kali were given importance there later, endowed with war prowess and trickster-like sexuality.  Kali embodies Se clearly.

 

In these early cultures, someone like me would have been seen as the Ultimate Feminine. 😉
Although it would be even better if I were an Sx 8 core instead of Sx 4 core, to fit that role. A little more war 😉

 

Over the years, the Western cultures took the Sx and the 8 out of female ideals, and turned them into Soc or Sp style Goddesses with pristine morals.  The ultimate Sp/So 2w1 saint is Jesus’s mother who gave birth to the Messiah without having sex.

This is, by no means, a universal, timeless way of viewing an ideal woman.

Aphrodite is a cousin of Mary – in that Aphrodite is 2w3 So/Sx. She’s a bit more free, mirthful and joyful in most depictions, but never warlike. Compared to Innanna and Ishtar, she is more modest – instead of squeezing her privates with a taunting smirk, she covers them with a coy smile.

 

Yet, Innanna was here first.

She was depicted as Sx/So 8w7.  Lusty, dangerous, strong, seductive, magnetic, ruthless.  Her  visceral desire was Se to the bone, and her style embodied the trickster, tricking and laughing at her prey.  There were major Te themes in “justice” and cunning tactics for war, and I might place her overall as Te > Se, but she was not Fe.

The meaning of Beauty changes over the centuries, just as the idea of “Good guy vs. Bad guy” changes over the centuries.  This is why @Auburn has a good point when he brings up Western culture valuing Fe, whereas other cultures (or people with specific values) might view it through the lens of unnecessary toil.

 

  • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Animal.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Animal.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Animal.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Animal.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Animal.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Animal.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Animal.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Animal.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Animal.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Animal.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Animal.
  • This reply was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by Auburn.

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